December 3, 2010

DAY FOUR OF THE BIG FREEZE

This much snow is unusual in Derbyshire. At least, not until January or February anyway. We often get an inch or two at this time of year then it is gone a few days later. This snow is set to stay for a while, I think.

Nick has been digging out the drive every day. Each time he got down to the tarmac, more snow fell. We had no more overnight last night so this morning he decided to bite the bullet and get the car out so that he could go and check on my Dad, who has been managing very well with the help of the contents of his freezer and some caring neighbours.

The car thermometer read -8°C as he set off.

I'm staying here to see if our new router and welcome pack arrives. According to the Royal Mail parcel tracking service it was delivered on 1st December, which it wasn't. I hope that means it is still on its way in the chaos and not that the driver dumped it in a hedge bottom somewhere.













10 comments:

  1. Smashing photographs. Especially the lovely Lulu, bottom deep in snow ;-)

    Poor old Spottie Dog is really struggling. All his normal cues have gone. The scents are buried and the sounds are all muffled so he just hugs close by my leg and won't even go out for a pee without me. Guide person for blind dog.

    Mad x

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  2. Lovely, typically English, snow scenes. Nice to look at, and remember with fondness those times of heavy snow when we lived in the UK. Although close to the Pyrenees, we don't get much snow, and what does fall melts quite fast with the heat of the sun. Lovely post.

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  3. Lovely photos Jean...especially the icicles!

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  4. The icicles look like those we encountered at Haut-Savoie at the end of year and beginning of this year 2010. How does the almost end of this year compare with the almost beginning of the year in your home UK town? SweetpeainFrance

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  5. Wow, you really did get it! Much worse than us. But then, we are in the "south." Cheers!

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  6. As the crow flys (or is it flies?) you must be about 30 - 40 miles away from us, but in snow terms world away!
    I hope that your Dad is coping well, with the help that you and other kindly people are able to give him. There have been some tragic stories on the news about elderly people who haven't been so fortunate.
    Have you been able to get in to work? If not, I hope you are well stocked with beads and ingredients for baking!

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  7. Love your piccies. Snow is very alien to us.
    You guys must be freezing - we were in the 30s today.
    Sorry, that was very mean of me, wasn't it?????

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  8. Oh, Jean! How very Canadian are your wonderful pictures! (Of course, we get winter for five months a year, so the snow and ice are "no big thing.") And -8°C; that's simply "fresh." That was our temperature yesterday; Sadie and I went for a walk; I didn't bother with gloves, or even doing up my winter coat.

    I see that Lulu, like Miss Sadie, is quite adaptable. It only takes these hardy dogs a day or two to get their "winter tires" on their feet; then they're "good to go" for the duration. Animals, like Dogs and Bears, are really very adaptable. It's the humans who seem to have all the trouble!

    Do take care. As we say in Canada, "Be cool, but stay warm." (Yes, it's a pun!)

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  9. I would think that at least, all that snow must be fun for the kids.
    -8 is very, very cold.

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