June 29, 2011

A QUITUS FISCAL AND ANOTHER GOOD LUNCH

After our nice breakfast in the Bar de la Préfecture, we headed back to Loches, having no idea where we might get a Quitus Fiscal.  We deduced it was some kind of customs document and thought it might be worth asking at the Tourist Office where to get one.

As we got nearer to Loches and nearer to the dreaded witching hour of 12pm when everything packs up for lunch, I remembered that it was Wednesday and that was market day.  This meant that the town would be very busy and parking would be difficult at this hour.  So Nick dropped me off at the Tourist office doors while he went off to find a parking space.

pizza3The boulangerie in Ligueil

I asked the very friendly and helpful young lady on the desk if she knew which office might provide this document and she began directing me to the Sous-Préfecture.  I grimaced, thinking I was fairly sure she was wrong, and she obviously had second thoughts, consulted her colleague and pointed out the Hôtel de Finance on the street map.  That definitely sounded more like it.

I dashed outside and found Nick waiting just around the corner, engine running, complaining that he could find nowhere to park.  I jumped in the car and we sped off along Rue de Descartes to find the Hôtel de Finance.  It was 11.45am.

pizza2 The Pizzeria in Ligueil

So he dropped me off again at the doors of the building and I dashed inside and stood at the reception desk in the deserted entrance hall.  Eventually a very helpful man appeared and I explained that I needed a Quitus Fiscal.  We then had one of those bizarre conversations where I spoke in my best French and he spoke in his best English.  He directed me up the stairs to Room 33 on the first landing.  Just at that moment Nick burst through the front doors and we both leapt up to the first floor, two steps at a time.

Room 33 also seemed to be completely deserted until a woman poked her head around a screen and smiled at us.  We uttered the words Quitus Fiscal and she smiled again and beckoned another jolly and friendly person to help.  A quitus fiscal is a customs document which determines if there is any duty to pay when the vehicle is imported to France.  This depends on the age of the vehicle and how many kilometres it has done.  The person that appeared in front of me inspected my UK registration document, driving licence, the EDF bill and ten minutes later, we walked out clutching the elusive Quitus Fiscal.  What a relief.  We were now in possession of all the paperwork we needed.

pizza1

So we made our way home via the pizza restaurant in Ligueil, the Mandoline.  Lunch was a fraction of the price of our fancy meal the day before but we enjoyed our pizzas just as much.

pizza4

We treated ourselves to pizza, tiramisu for dessert and coffee.  Then we went back to Le Grand-Pressigny to check our paperwork and tie up all the loose ends before posting our application for a carte grises back to the Préfecture in Tours.

pizza5

We needed to get photocopies of my passport, driving licence and the inevitable EDF bill.  We also needed to buy two envelopes.

Now how hard could that be?……you will be surprised!

11 comments:

  1. I am enjoying these posts as I have brought Nigel's Renault back with me this time and I will have to go through all this re -registration malarkey!! Diane

    ReplyDelete
  2. Diane - I will be writing a summary of how to go about it - but what ever you do, don't forget your EDF bill and your envelope !!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This quest for a carte grise is turning into a real Agatha Christie novel! Looking forward for the (happy?!) outcome. Martine

    WV = promism => a promising outcome perhaps!?

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have to laugh; Quitus Fiscal sounds like a made-up Monty Python name.
    Looks like you found a good pizzaria.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Martine - I am thinking of starting my own detective agency after this - on second thoughts, perhaps not, it's such hard work!!

    Dedene - it felt rather surreal like a Monty Python show at the time !!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Unfortunately, we non-Europeans have to go through all this stuff time and time again, to get cartes de séjour, cartes de résidences, and all kinds of tax documents and forms. Not to mention health insurance! When you live here for more than six months at a time, you find out. You need another six months just to get all the papers in order.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Merci pour l'histoire! Thanks for a helpfull story as i need to get a quitus fiscal in Tours as well and have.... had no idea how it works or why, it's good to know what documents are accepted to avoid getting there several times for nothing :-)Hope yoou enjoy your journey in Grand Pressigny.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ken Broadhusrt: is it that hard? Well i believe you. That's why UE is usefull, it helps with all these fussy administrative documents that are especially slow down here. That's the point to carry on Europe as well!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Where is the Hotel des Finances?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bromnie, I'm glad you found this post helpful.
      The Hotel des Finances we used was in Loches, on the road to Descartes, the D31, opposite the large car park at the Espace Agnes Sorel.

      Delete