March 12, 2013

HOW DO YOU TAKE YOUR PORRIDGE?

We take ours with snow !!

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Whenever it is snowy or very cold outside we always have porridge for breakfast. There’s something comforting and nurturing about a lovely bowl of porridge, with slightly indulgent additions, that makes us feel better and sustains us until lunchtime.

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It’s probably an instinct, or something we are programmed to do, having been fed porridge as youngsters, to keep us going through the lessons in cold classrooms until dinnertime (which is actually lunch time but at school it was always called dinner, not lunch, at noon).

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Porridge for two people:

1 mug porridge oats

1½ mugs milk

1 mug water

Put the above into a saucepan, bring to the boil and simmer for anything from five to twenty minutes, depending on how busy you are, how thick you like your porridge and whether or not you forget it’s on the stove while you’re putting you woolly socks on.

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Add more milk or water to thin it a bit if necessary.  If too much of it is stuck to the bottom of the pan, start all over again and say nothing.  Lulu will help to destroy the evidence !!

Serve hot with brown sugar, golden syrup, honey, squeezy Carnation milk, apple compote, ordinary milk or whatever takes your fancy.  Also with mug of hot steaming coffee (or tea).

How do you like yours ??

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39 comments:

  1. What do you do when you don't have a Lulu around to cover up the evidence?! :) Martine

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    1. Martine, that depends....on how bad the smell of burning is !! Sometimes you can get away with it, sometimes not !!

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  2. I now make it in the microwave, with a pinch of salt in the mix and just water. I have it with a little cold milk poured over and sprinkled liberally with dark brown sugar.

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    1. Susan, I use the microwave if it's just porridge for one but I don't get the salt thing.

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  3. In winter I have porridge every weekday, with toast or croissants at the weekend. As today was freezing Tim had some too.

    Tim's preference is for Golden Syrup whereas I have a teaspoonful of jam. I always make it in the microwave. I always mix some of whatever fruit we have today it was blueberries but for the past week or so it's been kiwi fruit.

    As a child I remember my mother making it as Susan suggests, with cold creamy milk and sugar on top.

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    1. Gaynor, jam - now that's an idea I must try.
      I have eaten it with Bon Maman confiture de lait, the jars of caramel, and it's yummy.

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  4. Hello Jean,
    You can't beat it when its cold can you! I always have a pinch of salt and some of our honey...
    Ivan

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    1. Ivan, how wonderful to have your own honey......

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  5. Our microwave method [adapted from Quackas Instant Oats]:
    35g podge to 180ml FULL cream milk...
    pinch of salt. 1.5 minutes full power...
    stir...
    1 minute full power [or 1.5 minutes medium]...
    stir if needed [depends on microwave power]...
    leave to stand for a further minute...
    add condiments of choice...
    maple syrup for me...
    Golden Syrup for Pauline...
    top of the bottle milk to taste...
    scoff!
    Enjoy.... have a second bowl if needed... it hasn't risen above Zero.5 Centipedes here all day... and with a strong wind it has felt lower, much lower!
    All the crocus has fell over!

    Wurd verification is "3357 eceania"...
    like Oceania...
    but colder and controlled by Brussels!

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    1. Tim, I do hope this cold spell is the end of winter and we can get on with spring now....please.

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  6. Jean, I never appreciated porridge, or what I would call oatmeal, until we moved to Scotland. Steel cut oats, cooked slowly with 1/2 milk and 1/2 water plus a pinch of salt, then finished off with a bit of brown sugar and maybe some cream. But, my Aberdonian colleagues rolled their eyes when I mentioned the sugar.

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    1. Aye lass! Salt... nevvvver forget... just salt!!

      WV is "biolert"... couldn't have liked the reference to salt... that's Big Brother for you!

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    2. Keir, the only time I ate porridge with salt was in a B&B in Edinburgh in 1972, and the only reason I managed to shovel it down was because the landlady was watching !!

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  7. We use Mornflake 'Superfast' oats: 1 cup oats to 2 1/2 cups water and a pinch of salt. It takes about 2 minutes from boiling to be ready, and I can't really taste any difference from traditional oats. As we're both Type 2 diabetics, we've had to give up on the Golden Syrup/brown sugar (which we loved!) and go over to Splenda - but it's quite nice, and I have it with bio yoghurt and the BH has milk. He made it this morning, and it was twice as thick as when I make it!! But however, it's a great rib-liner, and very comforting on these cold mornings. Our miniature poodles (silver grey boys, Smokey and the Bandit) haven't had a look in on porridge - but they had a taster of our curry at lunchtime!! When I get my blog started I'll post some pictures of them - and we'd love to see more of Lulu.

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    1. Helva, Lulu does have her own blog !! (see link on my sidebar) I look forward to reading about Smokey and Bandit - do let me know when you get going.

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  8. My DH makes ours just with water and I have it with a little sugar and some full-cream milk. Yum! It's the only thing he can cook with success every time. :-) A scattering of snow here, nowhere near as much as you have.

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    1. Perpetua, it's so long since I had full cream milk, but a squirt of the Carnation helps !!

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  9. i do not eat porridge.... being french it would never have occurred to us to do it, only when I came to the States did I come in contact with this custom...just like eating corn I was pretty shocked as it was considered as cattle feed, now it is a staple even in France!!!!!!

    Annie v.

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    1. Annie, most foods that taste good go global eventually but there are some that will remain a local custom. For example, I only ever ate grits in America - just once !!

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  10. I'm going to get thrown out of Scotland for disclosing this, but I can't eat porridge. I like the taste, I find it beautifully warming but I always feel queasy afterwards. No idea why! It must be the consistency I suppose.

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    1. Craig, how odd, what a shame you are missing out on the absolute joy that is porridge !!

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  11. My mother recently started to eat oatmeal. For her I add toasted walnuts and blueberries and brown sugar to the bowl. It always boils over, and afterwards I have to clean the glue-like substance off her stove top and her pan, inside and out. Does the microwave keep that from happening? She has a microwave, so maybe I'll try it that way next time I'm there.

    I think the salt thing may be Scottish.

    We just call it oatmeal. The only porridge I ever heard of was from the rhyme, Pease porridge hot.., which I doubt kids learn anymore.

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    1. Pease porrage is a rough puree of split green marrowfat peas and is a wonderful winter dish.

      Big Brother is still watching... wv has just come up as "Psumers 3919"... Psumers are obviously buyers and eaters of Peas!

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    2. Carolyn, boiling over is a danger even in the microwave so I always use a high sided bowl, such as a pudding basin. It doesn't look as smart but then neither does your porridge when it's boiled over !!
      I also use a tall saucepan on the stove.

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  12. I cannot remember the last time we had porridge. I often just have oats with cold mild but that is about it. Keep warm Diane

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    1. Diane, it sounds more like muesli if it's with cold milk, you should try my recipe and see what you think !!

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  13. I've never had porridge. But then it looks an awful lot like what we call oatmeal, which I love. And you have it will all the same things. I had a version of oatmeal I made with yogurt, granola, and raisins. Mmm. Mmm.

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    1. Mitchell, I think oatmeal is the same thing. Porridge oats are otherwise known as rolled oats, a very coarse kind of oatmeal. So therefore you have eaten porridge, and enjoyed it !!

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  14. I used to eat porridge all the time when I lived in Derby. Plus three generous spoons full of honey. I remember cooking it on a stove in the kitchen in the house I shared with Mike Leech (chap I went sailing with) and Doris the cat sitting on top of the cooker in the basement kitchen, drooling into the void (and my porridge)!

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    1. Phil, it's so nourishing, nurturing and cheap, yet it's somehow luxurious to eat at the same time, especially with honey !!

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  15. Jean, love this blog as well. Thanks for linking up for breakfast! Cheers

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  16. I never liked porridge until I went on holiday with a friend, she took hers only with a pinch of salt. It was definitely a texture thing. Porridge swimming in milk was definitley unpalatable. However, my dad took his with black treacle and fresh cream which was decidedly decadent and with some very useful side effects and it did taste good.

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    1. Black treacle and cream - not for the faint of heart - or weak of stomach methinks !!

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  17. i eat oatmeal nearly everyday but nothing as lovely as this. Mines the quick microwave cooking.
    But it's hot, cheap and quick and lowers my cholesterol. Yum.

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  18. I get the impression you didn't appreciate grits. Tant pis pour toi ! We always had grits or cream of wheat (with salt and butter, no sugar — with sugar or maple syrup was called "Yankee-style") where I grew up, and no oatmeal. Too gloppy. I understand oats are supposed to lower your cholesterol, but not if you put all that milk, cream, or butter in them.

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    1. Ken, I suspect grits vary depending on the person that makes them - I had them in a rather greasy diner somewhere miles from anywhere. But it did rather put me off them for good !!
      It's the gloopyness of porridge that makes it so delicious I think !!

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  19. Hi, I came across your blog after a conversation over breakfast which led to me googling whether the French eat porridge! Me and my husband enjoy porridge with brown sugar sprinkled on top, a good glug of double cream and a teaspoon or so of whiskey scattered on the top. It is unbelievable delicious and feels so decadent! I urge every porridge lover to try it!

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    1. Angela, I don't think the French eat porridge at all, but there are enough ex-pats that do to make it worth the supermarkets' while stocking Scott's porridge oats. At a price, of course!
      I love the way you take yours and will give it a try next time I make it!

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